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Make Room in Freezer for Tops’ Truckload Meat Sale, Then Bake Some Shortbread

The truckload meat sale is by far the  main event this week at Tops Market in Redding and Weaverville.  This week-long special is enough to entice me to clear out my chest freezer and stock up for fall cooking.

But something else caught my eye in this week’s Tops Market ad: Land o’ Lakes butter, 2 for $4.98. That’s about as low a price for Land o’ Lakes butter as you’ll find. I’m not usually a brand snob, but I know some cooks who only buy Land o’ Lakes butter, even when it’s not on sale. But it’s on sale at Tops Market now, and we are allowed to purchase four pounds per day. Pardon me while I get my purse and car keys.

Oh, Tops also has 4-pound sacks of granulated sugar on sale,  two for $3.98.

Now, with butter and sugar, you’ve pretty much found the ingredients for Scotch Shortbread, one of my favorite cookie recipes, given to me by friend Cindy Moore 20 or a million years ago.

Cindy’s shortbread tastes like the real McCoy, the kind of shortbread you’ll dream of after it’s all gone. It’s rich (read: butter), so Cindy always made her shortbread using the smallest cookie cutters, like little diamonds or squares no bigger than a tiny box of matches.

This recipe can also be pressed into the bottom of a cookie sheet with edges, and then score the dough before baking, and right after removing it from the oven. (If you wait too long, the cookie will be too cool and dry to cut, and you’ll own a 12″ by 6″ cookie. To be on the safe side, just use cookie cutters.)

That increases the number of cookies made, but using small cookie cutters wasn’t enough for me. As you can see from this stained, worn-out recipe card, I’ve multiplied the recipe as many as four times, with great success.

These freeze well, so when you clear out the freezer for the truckload meat sale, leave some room for shortbread for the holidays.

And if someone at Tops asks why you’re buying so much butter, tell them anewscafe.com sent you.

Cindy’s Scotch Shortbread Cookies

3/4 cup butter, softened
1/4 cup granulated sugar
2 cups flour

Heat oven to 350 degrees. Cream the butter and sugar together. Work in the flour. (I used my Kitchenaide for this part).

If the dough is too crumbly, mix in 1 to 2 tablespoons more soft butter.

Roll dough between 1/4 to 1/2 inch thick (yes, that thick) on a lightly floured, cloth-covered surface.

Cut into small shapes (triangles, hearts, etc.).

Place on an ungreased cookie sheet and bake for about 20 minutes, turning the trays in the oven half way through baking. By the way, if you roll out the dough to about 1/4, this requires less baking time. Check the cookies at about 10 minutes and see how they look. You want a cook that has very light brown around the edges where the cookie touches the pan. You don’t want a golden brown top, or the cookie will be too dry.

Feel free to use your imagination when it comes to decorating the cookies, either by dipping a portion of the cooled cookies in chocolate, and then sprinkling with slivered almonds or other nuts. Or drizzle them with white or regular melted chocolate. Or dust with powdered sugar.

Makes between 2 and 4 dozen (depending upon the cookies’ size and thickness).

This recipe sponsored by Tops Market in Weaverville and Redding.

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Click here to order a sandwich online from the Weaverville Tops Market.
Independent online journalist Doni Chamberlain founded what’s now known as anewscafe.com in 2007 with her son, Joe Domke of the Czech Republic. Prior to 2007 Chamberlain was an award-winning newspaper opinion columnist, feature and food writer recognized by the Associated Press, the California Newspaper Publishers Association and E.W. Scripps. She lives in Redding, CA.

Doni Chamberlain

Independent online journalist Doni Chamberlain founded what’s now known as anewscafe.com in 2007 with her son, Joe Domke. Chamberlain is an award-winning newspaper opinion columnist, feature and food writer recognized by the Associated Press, the California Newspaper Publishers Association and E.W. Scripps. She lives in Redding, California.

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