UPDATE Redding Police Officer-Involved Shooting

UPDATE

On Sunday, December 22nd, 2019, at 3:20 AM a Redding Police Officer was on patrol in the area of South Market Street and Parkview Avenue when the officer observed a white 2016 Scion passenger vehicle swerving across multiple lanes of traffic. The officer suspected the driver was possibly under the influence and initiated a traffic stop. The vehicle pulled into the parking lot of 2174 Pine Street and stopped.

The officer contacted the driver along with the two other occupants of the vehicle. The driver appeared to be under the influence and was acting suspicious. The vehicle was associated with a male subject who was wanted for felony theft and pending robbery charges from the State of Washington. Based on the circumstances, additional officers were requested to assist with the investigation. Two Redding Police Officers arrived, each of which had a civilian ride along in their patrol car.

Officers re-approached the vehicle and instructed the driver to exit but he refused. The driver rolled up the window, shifted the vehicle into reverse and quickly accelerated, striking the terraced embankment on the north side of the parking lot. The driver then shifted the vehicle into drive and quickly accelerated toward the three marked patrol cars. The driver sideswiped one patrol car, then rapidly accelerated toward a second patrol car where a civilian ride along was seated in the front passenger seat. The suspect vehicle did not make contact with the second patrol vehicle. The suspect then rapidly accelerated forward toward a third patrol vehicle. An officer was also next to the third patrol car and had to move out of the suspect vehicles path. The suspect vehicle then rammed head on with the third patrol car causing the airbags to deploy in the suspect’s vehicle.

During these events, a Redding Police Officer fired his duty weapon striking the driver immediately stopping his violent actions. Officers on scene immediately rendered emergency medical aid and called for additional medical personnel to respond. The driver was transported to the hospital where he was later pronounced deceased.

The Shasta County Multi-Agency Officer Involved Critical Incident Protocol was activated. The Shasta County Sheriff’s Office, Major Crimes Unit took over the investigation with assistance of the Shasta County District Attorney’s Office and Redding Police Departments Investigations Division. One passenger from the suspect vehicle and one civilian ride along was treated for injuries sustained when the driver rammed the patrol car. The identity of the driver is not being released pending notification of the next of kin. The investigation is active and ongoing. No further information will be released at this time.

An autopsy on the driver will be conducted later this week. Anyone with information about this investigation is urged to contact the Shasta County Sheriff’s Office, Major Crimes Unit at 530-245-6135 or mcu@co.shasta.ca.us

…………………………………………….

On 12/22/19 at approximately 0320 hours, Officers with the Redding Police Department conducted a traffic stop on Pine Street, just north of Cypress Avenue in Redding. During the course of the traffic stop, circumstances led to one officer discharging his firearm, striking the suspect. The suspect was transported to the hospital and was pronounced deceased. The Multi-Agency Officer Involved Critical Incident Team was notified and responded. The Shasta County Sheriff’s Office has been designated as the lead investigating agency and will release additional information as it becomes available.

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-from press release
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13 Responses

  1. Avatar James Montgomery says:

    Just a thought. Instead of saying “pronounced deceased,” why not just say “pronounced dead?”
    Euphemisms are popular these days, but simple truth should still suffice.
    This is merely a stylistic criticism. No big deal.
    Thanx for providing the information.

  2. Avatar Bruce Vojtecky says:

    I think more telling of the commenters on here is two on the official press release but over sixty and growing on the unofficial article put out before all the info was in.

  3. Avatar Mati says:

    Huh? No way I would be able to post my comment here. You have a certain “group” that not only posts, but responds, to each other with much dis-respect. I would call it hatred towards any opine but there own. I would think it tiring to consistently exchange insults with those who do post over, and over, and over again. And they seem so proud of themselves?!? I truly do not understand.

    To prove my point let’s see what response this post may get. If zero……..

  4. Avatar Mati says:

    OMG! My bad. I spelled “there” wrong. So sorry. Please forgive.

  5. Avatar Gary Tull says:

    I see in this update that the suspect was wanted for felony theft and pending robbery charges from the State of Washington. Yet there is no mention of the suspect possessing a firearm in Washington or in Redding, CA.

    I also recognize there were civilian passengers in two of the police cars– all vehicles presumably parked in close proximity to one another.

    I ask: Is it justifiable for police to kill a suspect for ramming police cars at close range because there are passengers in two of the police vehicles?

    • Avatar Doug Cook says:

      Gary, you left out the part where there were officers out of and standing next to their cars when the suspect started ramming the patrol cars, putting their lives in danger. So the answer is…yes, it is justifiable to do whatever necessary to stop the threat. It is quite easy for anyone to do Monday morning quarterbacking after the fact.

      • Avatar Gary Tull says:

        The update reads ONE officer who moved out of the way.

        “An officer was also next to the third patrol car and had to move out of the suspect vehicles path.”

        • Avatar Tim says:

          Gary: police may use deadly force to stop a fleeing felon when “the officer has probable cause to believe that the suspect poses a threat of serious physical harm, either to the officer or to others” (see: Tennessee v Garner).

          • Avatar Gary Tull says:

            Yes Tim, I get the 1985 Supreme Court ruling on Tennessee v Garner. However in this case, it seems the officers could have opted first to try shots to the suspect’s car tires thus hindering the ramming effect- based on the what we know so far.

          • Avatar Tim says:

            There isn’t a major department in America with a use of force policy allowing beat cops the use of deadly force to intentionally wound a suspect or disable a car. Every bullet that leaves the barrel in public is attached to a lawsuit and the average officer’s marksmanship is no where near good enough to mimic Hollywood fantasy. Remember that there are departments (NYPD) that miss over 80% of the time despite aiming for center mass…

  6. Avatar Miguel says:

    At this point, I’m content to leave this to the investigation(s). But has anyone else picked up on the (possible) inconsistency of the following back to back statements? It seems like we have two “final events” here — a fatal shot — and a head on deploying airbags in both vehicles.

    ” The suspect vehicle then rammed head on with the third patrol car causing the airbags to deploy in the suspect’s vehicle.”
    “During these events, a Redding Police Officer fired his duty weapon striking the driver immediately stopping his violent actions.”

  7. Avatar Miguel says:

    Oh — and not a single doubt that this was a justifiable use of force. No question.

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