The Tree Goddess: The Lorax vs. The Truax

We all know the story of the Lorax – that witty and word-twisting story from Theodor Seuss Geisel that has taught generations of soon-to-be tree huggers about the consequences of wiping out whole species. I have always enjoyed this story – in fact, it’s right up there with “The Giving Tree” as one of my top favorite American stories of all time.

Recently, I discovered a story written by a member of the hardwood flooring industry called “The Truax”.

Apparently, “The Lorax” has been banned from many libraries and schools in communities where logging is the primary source of income. “The Truax” was written in rebuttal to our beloved Suess story.

Now, I do admit to being a tree hugger. And why not? I absolutely LOVE trees and everyone needs a hug once in awhile. Although some industries do infuriate me with their environmentally un-sound actions, I never find the motivation to chain myself to a tree while hoping to not get pepper-sprayed. I believe this world is big enough for everybody and everyone has their side to the story. I read “The Truax” and, frankly, I kinda liked it. How truthful it really is to say how logging companies steward the land is up for debate, but it does teach the younger generations that there can be a way for tree-huggers and tree-loggers to live in peace.

It also reminds us adults of the same thing. We all know there is room for improvement and companies need to be more responsible in their practices. However, digging our heels in and refusing to agree to disagree gets us nowhere fast.

So, here is a link to that story, written by Terri Birkett. Read with an open mind and enjoy….

http://www.stuartflooring.com/downloads/truax.pdf

marieMarie Stadther’s life in Coachella Valley was void of trees. In 2001, she packed up and headed north. After a drive through the majestic redwoods, she arrived in Redding, where she immersed herself in horticulture as owner of her own landscaping company and as assistant to an arborist. She is now the lead gardener for Turtle Bay’s McConnell Arboretum and Botanical Gardens. Her love of trees is a way of life, and she shares that passion with the community. Send the Tree Goddess your questions at mstadther@turtlebay.org.

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's life in Coachella Valley was void of trees. In 2001, she packed up and headed north. After a drive through the majestic redwoods, she arrived in Redding, where she immersed herself in horticulture as owner of her own landscaping company and as assistant to an arborist. She is now the lead gardener for Turtle Bay's McConnell Arboretum and Botanical Gardens. Her love of trees is a way of life, and she shares that passion with the community. Send the Tree Goddess your questions at mstadther@turtlebay.org.
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9 Responses

  1. Avatar AJ says:

    Interested to read that you grew up in Coachella Valley. Where? Me too. I'm a product of Thermal Elementary School in Thermal and Rooseveldt Jr. Hi. in Indio.

    I can remember, after coming home from visiting Idylwild, standing out in our front yard, looki9ng up at the sky and saying, "God if you would just let it rain more here, we could have trees here like they do in the mountains." I was quite sure that God had never thought of that, I was five or so.

    • Avatar Tree Goddess says:

      Thank you for reading the blog. I have lived in Indio, Coachella, La Quinta, Palm Desert and Palm Springs. I visit (my father is still there) once in awhile and really enjoy seeing the desert again. However, I am happy to be living in a place where trees do grow, naturally.

  2. Avatar Insanity Prevails says:

    Thanks for introducing me to the The Truax. I will be looking to pick it up for my grand daughter. A fitting response to those who think that all loggers are careless capitalist pigs. Maybe we should send a few copies to the US Forest Service who seemingly have an ongoing problem with a certain spotted owl that threatens the managed use of 10 million acres in California alone. I remember a few things I learned in school about dinosaurs, Darwinism and the course of nature that some people don't just seem to understand … or maybe they just don't want to.

  3. Avatar AJ says:

    Marie,

    Here's a Coachella Valley story for you. I remember going with my parents to look at a house in LaQuinta. Three bedroom. Spanish style. I distinctly recall them discussing the price and deciding that $3200 (yes, that's TWO zeros) was just more than they could afford. The year was 1940… (yup, I'm really old!) Instead they bought a house in Thermal. Wish foresight vision were as accurate as hindsight!!

  4. Jennifer Jewell Jennifer Jewell says:

    So interesting – one of my closest friends from high school, the man who designed my Jewellgarden.com website is Charles Truax – never thought of his name as an interesting word play before, I guess I better send this link to him…:) Thanks Marie!

  5. Good article! I am not familiar with the lorax, but I, too, believe that we should all just get along!

  6. Hi, yesterday i found the lorax book in the world wide web and i looks very well. I think that its a good book for my brothers. Sandra enjoys the books from mr. Seuss.Bye.

  7. Avatar S Pohlman says:

    Thank you so much! I remember this book from when I was a kid (my dad is in the trucking industry) and I was using it as part of an assignment and I now discover that EVERYBODY hates that little book. It made me a little sad inside to find that something so dear to my childhood was the BANE of the existence of so many people. I felt that I should thank you for having something good to say about it. So THANK YOU!!!!

  8. Avatar max says:

    i <3 r=trees