Just Sayin’: Doors, Doors and More Doors

Doors, doors and more doors.

Not the seminal rock group. Sorry.

There are doors . . . and then there are doors.

Doors always carry the implication that there is something on the other side. Good, bad or indifferent, there is something there. Something you may want. Or not. Something someone else might want. Or not.

Doors are important.

Doors carry the freight of all kinds of emotional, psychological and philosophical import. Doors to someplace; doors away from someplace; doors to keep things in; doors to keep things out. Doors that define and doors that allow our consciousness to expand.

Yes, I do have some strongly held ideas about doors.

Doors express a whole plethora of emotions. You throw open a door to welcome loved ones. You open a door in trepidation. You lock a door for security. You close a door for privacy. You can even slam a door in anger.

But I believe that one of the more important doors you may live with is your front door. The front, or entryway door to where people live says something important to the world. OK, two important things.

First, a front door ought to tell the world where the entrance is located. Well, you may think, that’s kind of a given, isn’t it? You’d be surprised at how many times you approach a house and you really have to hunt for the front door. And not infrequently the front door isn’t the main door of use. In the house where I grew up the kitchen door was the primary door of use. If someone came to the front door we knew that they were either a stranger or a sales person.

Second, I believe that your front door should say something important about you. Do you like color? Do you like highly ornamented things? Do you like classic simplicity; or glass panels that allow the outside to see in? Does your front door express energy or reluctance to meet the world? All those things can be at least hinted at with the treatment of the front door.

I love a front door that makes a statement, like bold color that contrasts or complements the exterior of the house. When that happens, it tells me that those living inside are welcoming to the world, and happy with who they are.

I love beveled glass panels. In daylight they bring rainbows into the room. At night they refract and play with the light from inside and tell me that those living inside are pretty open to the world around them.

I love a highly carved door. It tells me that the door’s maker had a creative imagination.

I love front doors with a history: “I found this door thrown away at a construction site,” or, “I saw this door and just had to have it,” or, “This was the front door in the house where I grew up.”

Any one of a dozen stories can be told by a front door.

I not only think that front doors can say a lot about you, I believe that many times, they tell the truth.

Adrienne Jacoby is a 40-plus-year resident of Shasta County and native-born Californian. She was a teacher of vocal music in the Enterprise Schools for 27 years and has been retired for 11 years.
A musician all her life, she was married to the late Bill Jacoby with whom she formed a locally well -known musical group who prided themselves in playing for weddings, wakes, riots, bar mitzvas and super market openings. And, oh yes . . . she has two children, J’Anna and Jayson.

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Adrienne Jacoby
Adrienne Jacoby is a 40-plus-year resident of Shasta County and native-born Californian. She was a teacher of vocal music in the Enterprise Schools for 27 years and has been retired for 11 years. A musician all her life, she was married to the late Bill Jacoby with whom she formed a locally well -known musical group who prided themselves in playing for weddings, wakes, riots, bar mitzvas and super market openings. And, oh yes … she has two children, J’Anna and Jayson.
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13 Responses

  1. Avatar Sally says:

    OK now I can't wait to go to your house and asses your front (or entry) door. You gave no hint as to what you have and thus who or what you are!

  2. I painted my front door deep red a couple of years ago – I love it. I like to think it's inviting – kinda fun. The BB hole in the leaded-glass window says my kids have fun. The cobwebs and other debris that decorate the outside entry let's everyone know: "The spiders and the frogs have fun." A whole lotta fun going on here. Thanks, Adrienne.

  3. Avatar Joanne Lobeski Snyde says:

    What a great article. I've not thought much about doors, but I you described how an often overlooked part of our lives reflects our culture and our experiences in life. That door might be a cloth covering between one living area and another. It might be the subject of a spectacular photograph from Africa or Italy. It might be left unlocked, or be triple locked.

  4. Avatar Claudia says:

    I usually go in through my garage door because that is where I get out of the car.

    But I always prefer my guests to come in through the front door…much more welcoming.

  5. Avatar Mike Ferrier says:

    Adrienne, I see your door as multi-colored with sequins. It is the one you opened to thousands of young people who now have beautiful doors of their own. Can a doorbell do four part harmony?

    The front of our house is an invitation. Large oval leaded glass in a mahogany door plus another 58 panes of glass in the other front windows. Not audacious…inviting.

  6. Avatar CoachBob says:

    No Mike. Not multi-colored or sequined….I painted AJ's front door. Bold Blue! Bold like the writer of this article.

  7. Avatar Diane Knapik says:

    My front door is dark brown, decorated with a dull, formerly bronze, knocker. Leaves are piled up in the corners and the storm door screen has a few small tears in it which are covered with pieces of scotch tape. (I know this, because I just opened it to look!)

    My home is 40 years old – the same age as the door.

    My carport door, however, is white with multple panes of glass. It is only 2 years old. It is usually standing open, protected from the weather by a white storm door. Guess which door is used consistantly.

    I was at a fiddle contest in Redbluff a couple of years ago when I got a message from a friend, saying she had gone by my house and the "front door" was standing open. She checked the house and everything looked okay. I left the contest immediately and raced home to Happy Valley, where everything was fine, except my nerves. Why would my front door be open, when I rarely open it? Turns out, my friend always thought of the carport door as the "front" door, because it's the only one she ever used.

  8. Avatar Yvonne Boring says:

    I too grew up in a house where the kitchen door was the welcome door! We knew if anyone came to the front door they were strangers or salesmen. I love my new front door. It is easily accessible and I have a glass storm door too. That way I can welcome the sun (when it does shine). Makes the whole house very cozy on a sunny winters day.

    Great article, looking forward to your next one!

  9. Avatar Stan says:

    Whew! I was getting worried, as I read along, until I came to the line about beveled glass. We didn't choose 'em, but we like 'em. Thanks, AJ, your article will make us appreciate them more now.

    Stan

  10. Avatar Juanita Echelbarger says:

    Hey, Adrienne…I remember your "kitchen" front door" quite well. One of my favorite memories is when as a teenager, your Mom would always say, "Remember who you belong to," as we were leaving" through that door. I found myself repeating that phrase to my children from the time they were quite young to present day.

    I had a birthday about two weeks ago, Adrienne, and I didn't realize I could use 40-plus from this day forth. Thank you!

  11. Avatar KarenC says:

    Our house is the color of river rock, the front door is an aqua blue shade. I have a carved stone welcome sign above my door bell. My front porch is plant haven, with a pot of beautiful, in season flowers. A pot by the door has ferns, trailing plants which bloom in the spring. We have good curbside appeal, with a trail all along the walkway filled with flowers all spring, summer and fall. A stone bench resides on the porch, so I can go out on spring, summer and fall mornings and watch all the kids going to school, riding bikes, folks walking dogs, people going to work, while I have my morning juice. Ah, I love a front porch with a pretty door! Great article.