THURSDAY UPDATE – Old Forecaster: Wet Weather Through the Weekend

Updated Thursday a.m., January 19 — The cold air is still trapped in the valley from Redding northward and snow levels this morning
north of Redding continue near the 1,000 foot elevation.

Redding is currently in the upper 30s with calm winds while to the south in Chico it is in the mid 40s with south winds gusting to 20 mph. The cold air will probably stay in place until later this afternoon when the southerly winds will finally break through and scour it out.

This means snow levels continuing near the 1,000 foot elevation in the I-5 corridor north of Redding at least till early this afternoon.

There is a fairly wet storm system now moving on the coast and this is the first of several which will move across the north state over the next 5 days. These storms will be preceded by gusty southerly winds. Snow levels by late this afternoon will be 3,500 to 4,000 feet and should rise
to near 5,000 to 5,500 feet on Friday. The snow level will drop back to near 3000 feet on the weekend.

There will be short breaks between the storms, but for the most part the Redding area will see wet and windy conditions through the weekend. I would expect that by the end of the weekend Redding will have received 2 to 3 inches of rain.

 

CalTans Thursday Updates: Trinity County SR 299 EB/WB LANES CLOSEDFOR OFF LOADING OF OVERTURNED TANKER 4.35 MI EAST OF WEAVERVILLE. THE ROADWAYIS OPEN WITH UP TO ONE HOUR INTERMITTENT CLOSURES AND WILL CONTINUE UNTILOFF LOADING OF TANKER IS COMPLETE.

Trinity SR 299 PM 40 WB lane blocked dueto a rock and mud slide approximately 3.4 miles west of Junction City.

 

Updated Wednesday, January 18, 4:30 p.m.

SNOW POSSIBLE DOWN TO 700 FEET UNTIL MIDNIGHT…. VERY WET WEATHER THURSDAY THROUGH THE WEEKEND…

The first storm system is still sitting over northwest California and has not moved east during the day.  Snow levels dropped to just below 1000 feet early today.  Cold air still trapped in the north end of the valley.  Light precipitation will continue tonight and snow levels could drop as low as 700 feet, but amounts will be very light.  A couple more inches of snow are possible tonight at and above the 1000 foot elevation.   The cold air should be scoured out shortly after midnight and warmer air will move in and snow levels will rise.

We will move into a wet and windy pattern starting Thursday and continuing through the weekend.  There will be a series of storms move through the area, with a storm every 18 to 24 hours.   Each of these will be preceded by gusty southerly winds.  The strongest winds look like they will occur this weekend when Redding will see gusts in excess of 40 mph.   Snow levels by late Thursday and Friday will have risen to about 5000 feet, but should drop back down to 3000 to 4000 feet by the weekend.   There will be brief breaks between the storms, but overall the next 5 to 7 days looks pretty wet.

Check the weather section of A News Café for daily updates on the weather.

The Old Forecaster…

Updated Wednesday, Jan 18 at 10:30 a.m.

The first storm system is now moving onto the coast and it is overrunning the cold air that this trapped in the north end of the valley and canyons north of Redding. This is the classic pattern for snow in the Redding. However, as noted yesterday it depends on several things, one of which how long before the southerly winds move in from the south and scour the cold air out. Currently Redding is in the 30s with light north winds and Red Bluff is in the 40s with light southerly winds. The precipitation has moved in a little early than I expected yesterday. Currently where I live on the westside of town (700 foot elevation) it is raining with the temperature 37 to 38 degrees. I think we will see light precipitation today and tonight. The snow level will drop to 500 to 700 feet. This means central and northern Redding could see snow. Accumulations won’t be a lot in Redding with trace amounts in town and maybe 1 to2 inches in the northern and western sections. The snow level will begin to slowly rise this evening. However areas along the I-5 corridor will continue to see light snow until early Thursday so accumulations will be heavier.

We will move into a wet and windy pattern starting Thursday and continuing through the weekend. There will be a series of storms move through the area, with a storm every 18 to 24 hours. Each of these will be preceded by gusty southerly winds. The strongest winds look like they will occur this weekend when Redding will see gusts in excess of 40 mph. Snow levels by late Thursday and Friday will have risen to about 5000 feet, but should drop back down to 3000 to 4000 feet by the weekend. There will be brief breaks between the storms, but overall the next 5 to 7 days looks pretty wet.

Check the weather section of A News Café for daily updates on the weather.

Check the weather section of A News Café for daily updates on the weather.

Click here for the Monday and Tuesday’s forecasts.

Check road conditions from Caltrans.

Winter driving tips from Caltrans.

~ The Old Forecaster …
From Shasta County Public Health press release:

Stay Safe, Help Others During Cold Weather

Cold winter weather is upon us, but you can stay safe and healthy by planning ahead, staying inside and keeping warm.

The homeless and older adults are especially susceptible to the dangers of cold weather. Other groups at risk include infants, people who work or are active outside, and people who live in poorly insulated homes without heat or power.

“We are especially concerned about those who may be exposed to cold overnight temperatures or who cannot afford to use their heat,” said Andrew Deckert, MD, MPH, Shasta County Health Officer. “Hypothermia and carbon monoxide poisoning are health hazards, especially at this time of year.”

Be aware of carbon monoxide hazards

When you build a fire indoors, be aware of carbon monoxide poisoning. Burning wood or fossil fuels (such as gasoline, coal, propane, oil or methane) creates carbon monoxide, an invisible, odorless, colorless and toxic gas. Heating and cooking equipment can also create carbon monoxide, and vehicles running in a garage can produce dangerous levels. Mild carbon monoxide poisoning can feel like the flu (nausea, headache and drowsiness), but more serious poisoning or prolonged exposure can lead to difficulty breathing and to death. High concentrations of carbon monoxide can be dangerous even if a person is exposed to it for a short time. Accidental deaths occur every year in the United States because of carbon monoxide poisoning.

Protect yourself:

  • Never use a gas range or oven to heat a home.
  • Never use a charcoal grill, lantern or portable camping stove inside a house, garage, tent or camper.
  • Don’t run a vehicle or other fueled engine (including a generator) inside a closed garage or basement or outside an open window, door or vent where exhaust can vent into an enclosed area.
  • Keep vents and flues free of debris, especially if winds are high. Flying debris can block ventilation lines. Have your chimney checked annually.
  • If you suspect carbon monoxide poisoning, consult a health care professional right away.

How you can help others:

  • Check on your neighbors or relatives who may be vulnerable.
  • Be aware of the warning signs of hypothermia in adults and children: shivering, exhaustion, confusion, fumbling hands, memory loss, slurred speech or drowsiness. Infant symptoms include: bright red, cold skin and/or very low energy. If you notice any of these signs get medical attention immediately.

For more information, contact Shasta County Public Health at 225-5591 or 1-800-971-1999 or visit our website at www.shastahhsa.net.

###

Chris Fontana, aka The Old Forecaster, started his career as a meteorologist with the National Weather Service (NWS) in Sacramento. After four years as a weather officer in the U.S. Air Force, Chris transferred to the NWS office in Redding, where he was the meteorologist in charge from 1976 until the office closed in 1996. From 1996 until his 2005 retirement, he was the meteorologist in charge of the U.S. Forest Service Predictive Service Unit. Chris and his wife Jane have been married over 40 years and he works as a window covering installer in her business, Westwood Window Coverings.

A News Cafe, founded in Shasta County by Redding, CA journalist Doni Greenberg, is the place for people craving local Northern California news, commentary, food, arts and entertainment. Views and opinions expressed here are not necessarily those of anewscafe.com.

Chris Fontana
-- a.k.a. "the Old Forecaster" -- started his career as a meteorologist with the National Weather Service (NWS) in Sacramento. After four years as a weather officer in the USAF he transferred to the NWS office in Redding. He was the meteorologist in charge of the Redding office from 1976 until it closed in 1996. From 1996 until his retirement in 2005, he was the meteorologist in charge of the USFS Predictive Service Unit. Chris and his wife Jane have been married over 40 years and he works as a window covering installer in her business, Westwood Window Coverings.
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5 Responses

  1. Avatar Adrienne Jacoby says:

    I love our snow pattern. Just enough to be fun but seldom sticks around long enough to become tiresome. . . Just like a thoughtful guest!

    Bring it on!

  2. Avatar Chuck Sanborn says:

    By God, the Old Forecaster comes thru again!

  3. Avatar ColdSnap says:

    "As the county's only shelter, the mission is scarcely equipped to handle its homeless population, said Community Relations Director Ken White.

    "We're feeling extraordinarily overwhelmed by the amount of services needed by people in the community," he said. "If the economy worsens, or even stays as it's been, that could be a very at-risk population as a community I don't feel like we're very prepared to service at this point."

    The mission has only about 120 beds, he said, but because staff members try to help everyone they can, up to 70 extra guests at a time often sleep on the chapel floor.

    "There's a huge need," he said.

    And the mission's 30-day time limit means it's hardly a solution to Redding's homelessness situation, he said.

    "The goal is, we want to be an emergency service," he said.

    "We're not a long-term shelter."

    http://www.redding.com/news/2011/apr/23/145they-h

  4. Avatar Jeannette says:

    Hi, Chris –

    We sure appreciate your informative, comprehensive, and wonderfully accurate forecasts. Have learned more from your writings about weather patterns, etc., than I ever knew before!

  5. Avatar Mason says:

    Thanks for including Chico in your forecast!